Filipino Restaurants around the World

I love how the Filipino cuisine is slowly emerging as one of the world’s most loved cuisines. After a Filipino chef’s win care of a mean sinigang in the TV show Top Chef, and Andrew Zimmern’s declaration that Filipino cuisine is the next big thing in the world, we just couldn’t be prouder.

Add to that the improving economy of the Philippines, and you get the formula for success. More opportunities for Filipinos to venture abroad, and more chances for the Filipino cuisine to break through.

In fact, the Filipino food revolution has already started. Here’s a list of some Filipino restaurants you’ll see around the world.

Grill 21: Manhattan, New York

This just sounds like a dream come true. Filipino food right in Manhattan? Longsilog served in the streets of New York? High five, or rather, apir, to the owner! It’s been getting good reviews, and I’m not surprised. Who will say no to barbecue done the Filipino way? Who can resist the smell of bangus and tilapia fried to perfection? And, more importantly, adobo in New York just sounds downright sosyal.

Bonifacio: Singapore

A Filipino restaurant in Singapore isn’t so surprising. There are lots of Filipinos in the country, and so putting up a restaurant is synonymous to bringing home closer to the many Pinoys living there. Singaporeans should be happy too, what with all the delicious dishes such as crispy pata, kaldereta and sago’t gulaman. I’m craving right now.

La Mesa: Sydney, Australia

The establishment of La Mesa in Sydney is again proof that there are Filipinos everywhere. But what is exciting about La Mesa is that Australians also love it. They serve Filipino staples such as buko juice, kare kare, adobong pusit and halo-halo for dessert. One of the big come-ons to this restaurant is the friendly staff, something that we can all be proud of.

Philippine Islands: Edinburgh, Scotland

A fine dining place in the fine country of Scotland, Philippine Islands serve Pinoy food elegantly, much like how modern Filipino restaurants do it in the Philipines today. It is well-loved by the upscale Brits. The menu is in Filipino, but with English subtitles, much like the French or Italian menu you read when you eat out. Talk about Filo class!

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